Performance management

Performance management entails both performance and management which can sometimes be intricately linked when they should be separate. For example, being unable to identify ambitious employees for promotion could result either in a wrong promotion or losing potentially ambitious employees. 

We understand this process well and our consultants will create a work environment in which people are unable to perform to the best of their abilities. We aim at building a high-performance culture for both the individuals and the teams so that they jointly take the responsibility of improving the business processes on a continuous basis and at the same time raise the competence bar by upgrading their own skills within a leadership framework. Its focus is on enabling goal clarity for making people do the right things in the right time. 

It may be said that the main objective of a performance management system is to achieve the capacity of the employees to the full potential in favor of both the employee and the organization, by defining the expectations in terms of roles, responsibilities and account abilities, required competencies and the expected behaviors.

The main goal of performance management is to ensure that the organization as a system and its subsystems work together in an integrated fashion for accomplishing optimum results or outcomes.

The process of managing performance for employees involves a shared understanding of what is needed to be achieved at the organizational level. It involves alignment of the business objectives with the employees’ skills, competency requirements, future development plans as well as delivering desirable outcomes.

Performance management is not an annual appraisal meeting. It is not preparing for that appraisal meeting nor is it a self-evaluation. It’s not a form nor is it a measuring tool although many organizations may use tools and forms to track goals and improvements, they are not the process of performance management.

Performance management is the process of creating a work environment or setting in which people are enabled to perform to the best of their abilities.

Performance management is a whole work system that begins when a job is defined as needed. It ends when an employee leaves your organization.

Performance management defines your interaction with an employee at every step of the way in between these major life cycle occurrences. Performance management makes every interaction opportunity with an employee into a learning occasion.

Components of a Performance Management System

The performance management system may contain all of these components, but it is the overall system that matters, not the individual components. Many organizations have been able to develop effective performance management systems without all of the following practices.

A performance management system includes the following actions:

  • Develop clear job descriptions using an employee recruitment plan that identifies the selection team.
  • Recruit potential employees and select the most qualified to participate in interviews onsite.
  • Conduct interviews to narrow down your pool of candidates.
  • Hold multiple additional meetings, as needed, to get to know your candidates’ strengths, weaknesses, and abilities to contribute what you need. Use potential employee testing and assignments where they make sense for the position that you are filling.
  • Select appropriate people using a comprehensive employee selection process to identify the most qualified candidate who has the best cultural fit and job fit that you need.
  • Offer your selected candidate the job and negotiate the terms and conditions of employment including salary, benefits, paid time off, and other organizational perks.
  • Welcome the new employee to your organization.
  • Provide effective new employee orientation, assign a mentor, and integrate your new employee into the organization and its culture.
  • Negotiate requirements and accomplishment-based performance standards, outcomes, and measures between the employee and his or her new manager.
  • Provide ongoing education and training as needed.
  • Provide on-going coaching and feedback.
  • Conduct quarterly performance development planning discussions.
  • Design effective compensation and recognition systems that reward people for their ongoing contributions.
  • Provide promotional/career development opportunities including lateral moves, transfers, and job shadowing for staff.
  • Assist with exit interviews to understand WHY valued employees leave the organization.
  • The major objectives of performance management are discussed below:
  • To enable the employees towards achievement of superior standards of work performance.
  • To help the employees in identifying the knowledge and skills required for performing the job efficiently as this would drive their focus towards performing the right task in the right way.
  • Boosting the performance of the employees by encouraging employee empowerment, motivation and implementation of an effective reward mechanism.
  • Promoting a two-way system of communication between the supervisors and the employees for clarifying expectations about the roles and accountabilities, communicating the functional and organizational goals, providing a regular and a transparent feedback for improving employee performance and continuous coaching.
  • Identifying the barriers to effective performance and resolving those barriers through constant monitoring, coaching and development interventions.
  • Creating a basis for several administrative decisions strategic planning, succession planning, promotions and performance-based payment.
  • Promoting personal growth and advancement in the career of the employees by helping them in acquiring the desired knowledge and skills.

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